Wednesday, July 29, 2015

vintage decoupage suitcases


 I  decoupaged these  for a  friend  many years  back

















Saturday, July 11, 2015

Don't Stay in School

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          the    title    is a real eye catcher   -
   it is  meant that way  -
it  does  touch on  points that are very important  and not  taught .

walking sticks





Sunday, June 7, 2015

Alpha 1 A D







What is alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that may cause lung disease and liver disease. The signs and symptoms of the condition and the age at which they appear vary among individuals.
People with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency usually develop the first signs and symptoms of lung disease between ages 20 and 50. The earliest symptoms are shortness of breath following mild activity, reduced ability to exercise, and wheezing. Other signs and symptoms can include unintentional weight loss, recurring respiratory infections, fatigue, and rapid heartbeat upon standing. Affected individuals often develop emphysema, which is a lung disease caused by damage to the small air sacs in the lungs (alveoli). Characteristic features of emphysema include difficulty breathing, a hacking cough, and a barrel-shaped chest. Smoking or exposure to tobacco smoke accelerates the appearance of emphysema symptoms and damage to the lungs.
About 10 percent of infants with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency develop liver disease, which oftencauses yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). Approximately 15 percent of adults with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency develop liver damage (cirrhosis) due to the formation of scar tissuein the liver. Signs of cirrhosis include a swollen abdomen, swollen feet or legs, and jaundice. Individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency are also at risk of developing a type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma.
In rare cases, people with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency develop a skin condition called panniculitis, which is characterized by hardened skin with painful lumps or patches. Panniculitis varies in severity and can occur at any age.

How common is alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency occurs worldwide, but its prevalence varies by population. This disorder affects about 1 in 1,500 to 3,500 individuals with European ancestry. It is uncommon in people of Asian descent. Many individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency are likely undiagnosed, particularly people with a lung condition called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD can be caused by alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; however, the alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is often never diagnosed. Some people with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency are misdiagnosed with asthma.

What genes are related to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene cause alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. This gene provides instructions for making a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin, which protects the body from a powerful enzyme called neutrophil elastase. Neutrophil elastase is released from white blood cells to fight infection, but it can attack normal tissues (especially the lungs) if not tightly controlled by alpha-1 antitrypsin.
Mutations in the SERPINA1 gene can lead to a shortage (deficiency) of alpha-1 antitrypsin or an abnormal form of the protein that cannot control neutrophil elastase. Without enough functional alpha-1 antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase destroys alveoli and causes lung disease. Abnormal alpha-1 antitrypsin can also accumulate in the liver and damage this organ.
Environmental factors, such as exposure to tobacco smoke, chemicals, and dust, likely impact the severity of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.



How do people inherit alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

This condition is inherited in an autosomal codominant pattern. Codominance means that two different versions of the gene may be active (expressed), and both versions contribute to the genetic trait.
The most common version (allele) of the SERPINA1 gene, called M, produces normal levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin. Most people in the general population have two copies of the M allele (MM) in each cell. Other versions of the SERPINA1 gene lead to reduced levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin. For example, the S allele produces moderately low levels of this protein, and the Z allele produces very little alpha-1 antitrypsin. Individuals with two copies of the Z allele (ZZ) in each cell are likely to have alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Those with the SZ combination have an increased risk of developing lung diseases (such as emphysema), particularly if they smoke.
Worldwide, it is estimated that 161 million people have one copy of the S or Z allele and one copy of the M allele in each cell (MS or MZ). Individuals with an MS (or SS) combination usually produce enough alpha-1 antitrypsin to protect the lungs. People with MZ alleles, however, have a slightly increased risk of impaired lung or liver function.

https://www.alpha1.org/Newly-Diagnosed/Learning-about-Alpha-1/Testing-for-Alpha-1

get tested  .

Testing for Alpha-1

FingerStick

Who should be tested?

The Alpha-1 Foundation encourages testing for Alpha-1 among those at high risk for this genetic disorder. Early diagnosis can help an Alpha consider different lifestyles, professions or other personal decisions that could maintain or improve their health.
The World Health Organization (WHO), the American Thoracic Society (ATS), the European Respiratory Society (ERS), and the Alpha-1 Foundation’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee (MASAC) recommend that anyone diagnosed with the following diseases should be tested for Alpha-1:
  1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
  2. Emphysema
  3. Bronchiectasis
  4. Chronic bronchitis
  5. Asthma that is incompletely reversible after aggressive treatment
  6. Chronic liver disease
  7. Unexplained liver disease in infants and children
  8. The skin disease panniculitis

Ways to Test

Anyone can ask their doctor to test them for Alpha-1 or they may choose to be tested confidentially through the Foundation’s Alpha-1 Coded Testing (ACT) study.
Many people at risk for Alpha-1 delay being tested due to concerns about privacy of test results. The Alpha-1 Foundation supports a confidential opportunity to be tested for Alpha-1 through the Alpha-1 Coded Testing (ACT) Study. This research study is conducted at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and examines people’s thoughts and feelings about the risks and benefits associated with learning genetic information. Testing through the ACT Study is free and confidential.
try here  
https://redcap.musc.edu/surveys/index.php?hash=621bf66ddb7c962aa0d22ac97d69b793
 For more information, contact the Alpha-1 Research Registry Program at MUSC toll-free at (877) 886-2383 or alphaone@musc.edu.
For information on the Alpha-1 Foundation Genetic Counseling Program at the Medical University of South Carolina, call (800) 785-3177 or click here.





my dad died 27 years ago from lung disease 5 years before that he had a hemorrhagic stroke and never walked or talked more than a few words after  several years before his brain hemorrhage he had the lower part of 1 lung removed because of damage they assumed it was from his job at the glass factory he worked there since he was a teen his dad worked there too - his dad died of liver disease . when I was a kid .
. 25 years ago my mother died from an aortic aneurysm she refused surgery because of the dangers and lived a  while after her diagnosis. my brother  Dennis   died  waiting for a  liver transplant .
  I was  diagnosed  11 years  ago    I get    weekly treatment  and use oxygen .  I am pretty happy  to be alive  and  my  arts  and  craft    work and  donations of it to charity keep me going .